Facebook to fight revenge porn

According to the Australia's Office of the eSafety Commissioner, "The pilot provides a portal for people concerned that an intimate image may be shared online to report it to the Office of the eSafety Commissioner who will notify Facebook to prevent any instances of the image being uploaded after the notification has been actioned".

"We're using image-matching technology to prevent non-consensual intimate images from being shared", said Antigone Davis, Facebook's head of global safety.

Facebook will notify the person once the photo has been "hashed'".

Facebook is telling users to send them naked pictures they might have of themselves for their own protection.

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The Guardian quoted Carrie Goldberg, a New York-based lawyer who specializes in sexual privacy, saying: "We are delighted that Facebook is helping solve this problem - one faced not only by victims of actual revenge porn but also individuals with worries of imminently becoming victims". "So this is impactful". Facebook is asking its Australian users to send their nude pics in order to avoid revenge porn on social media. Four percent of internet users have fallen victim to it, and 10 percent of women under 30 have had someone threaten to post explicit photos of them online against their will, according to a 2016 study by Data & Society. The measure is created to block users from sharing a photo before it can do harm.

Australia's e-safety commissioner Julia Inman Grant told ABC, 'We see many scenarios where maybe photos or videos were taken consensually at one point, but there was not any sort of consent to send the images or videos more broadly'.

The difference is for that the work, the photo needed to already be uploaded to Facebook.

In April, Facebook detailed plans to fight revenge porn, including an artificial intelligence tool capable of matching photos to prevent them from appearing on platforms like Messenger or Instagram.

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