Florida monkeys are excreting an infectious disease fatal to humans

Florida monkeys are excreting an infectious disease fatal to humans

Florida monkeys are excreting an infectious disease fatal to humans

Human cases of the virus have been rare, with about 50 documented worldwide, and there have been no known transmissions of it to people from wild rhesus macaques in Florida or elsewhere.

While Florida's officials determine their course of action, people in Florida are advised to steer clear from the monkeys when they see them to completely avoid the chance of being infected with the herpes B virus.

As a effect, the state's Fish and Wildlife Commission plans to rid the park of the roaming wild primates, which are native to South and Central Asia.

Eason could not augment on what particular organizational strategies the state may appoint but a spokeswoman said that the enterprise assists purifying the state of the fast growing creatures.

The animals' forebears were brought to an island in the Silver River early in the 1930s as a tourist attraction due to the popularity of the Tarzan movies.

A public relations representative for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission could not give comment about the state's plan at the time of this printing.

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"Additionally, macaques can negatively impact Florida native wildlife and pose potential risks to agriculture and recreation".

The wild monkeys were introduced in the state in the 1930 to increase tourism in the area.

Now nearly 30 percent of these reptiles drifting the park are excreting the herpes B virus during saliva and other body fluids. They like to roam outside parks and have even been spotted in cities. Still, he said, while the research confirms the presence of the virus in the monkeys' bodily secretions, more work needs to be done to establish how much virus there is, and how easily transferable it is.

Wiley said the researchers are interested in seeing the virulency of the pathogens. Blood tests showed the monkey carried herpes B. However, a woman who had been bitten by the monkey tested negative for the virus. A rhesus monkey on the loose in Pinellas County for more than two years was caught in October 2012.

Previous studies of the Silver Springs Park rhesus populations had identified herpes B in the animals, according to a study published in May 2016 by the University of Florida's Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS). While there are no official statistics on monkeys attacking humans in the park, a state-sponsored study conducted in the 1990s found that there were at least 31 incidents reported resulting in human injury between 1977 and 1984. The paper recommends that Florida wildlife managers consider the virus in future policy decisions.

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