Coli outbreak from romaine lettuce reaches Kentucky

E. Coli Outbreak Linked to Romaine Lettuce Claims Its First FatalityMore

E. Coli Outbreak Linked to Romaine Lettuce Claims Its First FatalityMore

The illnesses are linked to romaine lettuce grown in the Yuma, Ariz., region. At least 52 other people have been hospitalized, including 14 with kidney failure, which is an unusually high number of hospitalizations.

So far, infections associated with the outbreak have been detected in states all around country, with the most cases appearing in California, Pennsylvania, Alaska, Arizona, Idaho, and Montana.

A federal update says Kentucky is among the latest three states to become part of the E. coli O157: H7 outbreak, but the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention only lists one case in the commonwealth as of May 1.

The reported strain of E. coli, which produces poisonous substances known as Shiga toxins, can cause severe stomach cramps, bloody diarrhea and vomiting.

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Eve Plews, A local nutrition counselor stresses one way you can kill that E. Coli bacteria. Specifically, "the restaurants reported using bagged, chopped romaine lettuce to make salads".

Marler said, "It's 2018, and we're basically a month into this outbreak, and they can't link it to a farmer or a farm or a processor? I mean, candidly, that's ridiculous", Marler said. As a result, the CDC has reissued their ban on romaine lettuce, so don't eat any unless you are certain it did not come from that area.

The Food and Drug Administration said most people reported eating a salad at a restaurant, and romaine lettuce was the only common ingredient identified among the salads eaten. Numerous people sickened across the country consumed chopped lettuce that had been sold in bagged form to restaurants. Combined, they make up almost half of the reported cases. There are delays in reporting and confirming cases linked to this specific strain of E. coli, and the CDC noted that cases involving people who became sick on or after April 11 may not be reported.

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