Season's 1st tropical storm forms in eastern Pacific

Season's 1st tropical storm forms in eastern Pacific

Season's 1st tropical storm forms in eastern Pacific

In particular, a slowing of circulation as the polar regions warm up faster than equator ought to slow down storm tracks, as well.

Global warming is causing severe storms to move across the planet slower than ever before - and that's bad news for everyone. "Hurricane Harvey previous year was a great example of what a slow storm can do".

The western North Pacific basin, where the strongest systems are referred to as typhoons and super typhoons, sees the most storms annually and has seen the most slowing, at 20%.

"We've kind of hypothesized that this type of behavior may happen, this slowing down of the forward speed of the cyclones", said Colin Zarzycki, a climate scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research who has reviewed at Kossin's study.

That's the real risk of a slower storm.

Kossin told Nature that a 10% slow-down in storm speed corresponds to a 10% increase in rainfall when a hurricane makes landfall.

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Climate change is tinkering with and slowing down atmospheric circulation patterns - the wind currents that move weather along, Kossin said.

'The laws of thermodynamics reveal that, as the atmosphere warms by 1°C, the amount of moisture it can hold increases by 7 per cent.

"Tropical cyclones are just carried along by the wind, so it makes sense", Kossin says.

Christina Patricola, a scientist with the climate and ecosystem sciences division of California's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, called Kossin's work "important and new" and says she found it "pretty convincing".

Kossin concluded that the trend has all the signs of human-induced climate change.

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