Drinking Coffee May Help You Live Longer, Study Says

Drinking Coffee May Help You Live Longer, Study Says

Drinking Coffee May Help You Live Longer, Study Says

Blood samples and detailed medical histories, including health and lifestyle questions, showed that 33% of people drank between two and three cups of coffee a day. And the risk of death during the follow-up period was only slightly higher for people drinking around 4 cups of coffee a day compared with those who drank more than 8, he told Live Science.

Her team followed the 498,134 participants, aged 38 to 73, from 2006 until 2016, during which time 14,225 of them died.

They found non-coffee drinkers were more likely to have died than those that drunk coffee.

Drinking six or seven cups of coffee a day - almost twice the daily recommended limit - could help you live longer, according to new research.

Experts say that coffee is beneficial for health not just because of the caffeine but because of other compounds and antioxidants that they contan.

According to him, coffee got a bad reputation because in the past, many of those who enjoyed their brew also tended to smoke cigarettes.

However, despite the findings, the researchers are warning people not to significantly increase their coffee intake in a freakish quest for eternal life. While the study represents an median view of coffee drinking habits, it is encouraging reading for lovers of the toasted bean. A 2014 study found that there was zero evidence of dehydration with moderate daily coffee intake.

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Drinking coffee could cut the risk of death even in those who struggle to metabolize caffeine, scientists believe.

People should also be aware that some people have a physical sensitivity to coffee. An editorial by Eliseo Guallar from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health in Baltimore, Maryland, said there is no way to know if coffee prevents chronic disease and reduces mortality because there are too many factors to weigh like why people start drinking coffee. The study looked at some common gene variations that help determine whether someone metabolizes caffeine quickly or slowly, but didn't find any difference in health risk.

The study covered people who drank instant, ground and decaffeinated coffee. Part of the benefit, he points out, is that coffee simply makes people happy. However, the findings provide additional reassurance to coffee drinkers, while reinforcing previous research on the benefits of the beverage to human health.

As all this data shows, coffee is likely beneficial for most of us, and at the very least not harmful.

Other studies have found coffee drinkers have a lower risk of heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, several cancers, including colorectal, breast, uterine and liver, and Parkinson's disease.

When all causes of death were combined, even slow caffeine metabolisers had a longevity boost.

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