Space Station astronaut captures mammoth Hurricane Florence from directly above

- Even from orbit, Hurricane Florence looks like a monster.

Global space station NASA has revealed the extent of the hurricane "Florence", which is close to the coast of the United States. Get prepared on the East Coast, this is a no-kidding nightmare coming for you.

On Wednesday, NASA shared a view of Hurricane Florence taken that morning from a high-definition camera outside the International Space Station (embedded below).

Watching the scene unfold from space, German Alexander Gerst, an astronaut on board the ISS, tweeted photos of the enormous storm.

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Hurricane Florence latest forecast could still mean tropical impacts for Middle Georgia
Duke Energy has around 4 million customers in North and SC , and says it could take several weeks to restore the electricity. Across several eastern states, residents scrambled to leave as the Category 4 storm, with winds of 225kmh, approached.

Hurricane Florence looms over East Coast — WHAT’S HAPPENING
The storm's maximum sustained winds were clocked at 193km/h, before Florence was downgraded from a Category 4. Steady streams of vehicles full of people and belongings flowed inland Tuesday as North Carolina Gov.

"Ever stared down the gaping eye of a category four hurricane?"

Another photo (embedded below) was snapped on September 10 by astronaut Ricky Arnold while aboard the International Space Station.

The storm, which is poised to electrify millions this week within the southeastern USA, is "expected to raise existence-threatening storm surge and rainfall" to North Carolina, South Carolina and Virginia, and parts of the Mid-Atlantic states, the National Hurricane Middle (NHC) talked about. Outer bands from the hurricane were lashing land on Thursday, at least a full day before the National Hurricane Center expects the slow-moving storm's eye to blow ashore around the North Carolina-South Carolina line.

Those warily staring at Florence grasp in contrast it to Hurricanes Fran and Hugo, which pummeled North Carolina and SC, respectively, more than two decades ago.

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