Man coughs up massive blood clot shaped like bronchial tree

The man had been admitted to UCSF's Medical Center for chronic heart failure and developed a worsening cough

​Man Dies After Coughing Up Lung's Bronchial Tree

Earlier this week the New England Journal of Medicine tweeted a photo of what looked like a attractive piece of bright red coral to their 545,000 followers.

The photo, upon first glance, is eerily engaging, resembling a red tree that may have sprouted from the imagination of Tim Burton.

However, these medications also increase the risk of bleeding, including coughing up blood.

Last week, a hospitalized California man coughed up an intact cast of part of his right lung, a colossal blood clot almost six inches wide.

The man was reportedly "extubated" two days after the incident and suffered no further instances of coughing up blood.

"The right bronchial tree consists of three segmental branches in the upper lobe, two segmental branches in the middle lobe, and five segmental branches in the lower lobe", the case report's authors wrote.

They were stunned that it came out completely unbroken.

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They also suggested that the seals could have swallowed the eels and regurgitated it, causing the eels to come out the wrong way. Researchers recorded a record number of seal pups born on the main Hawaiian islands this year.

Though the clot is extremely unusual, it's not completely unheard of.

The six-inch-wide blood clot that was coughed up by an unnamed patient in the near-perfect shape of his right bronchial tree.

Thankfully this patient, and her unborn child, survived.

Georg Wieselthaler, a transplant and pulmonary surgeon at UCSF, told the Atlantic his team was easily able to identify the origin of the clot, it was so detailed.

A 40-year-old woman with asthma presented with a 2-day history of pleuritic pain of acute onset in the right side of the chest. "It's a curiosity you can't imagine-I mean, this is very, very, very rare".

Doctors aren't quite sure how the clot stayed intact while being coughed up, but Dr Wieselthaler suspects it could be due to the patient's higher level of fibringen in his blood, which acts like a glue.

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